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The Association of American Educators
AAE Blog
The Association of American Educators (AAE) is the largest national nonunion professional teachers association, advancing the profession through teacher advocacy and professional development, as well as promoting excellence in education, so that our members receive the respect, recognition and reward they deserve.

  • Weekly News Round-Up for February 16th

    Each week, AAE brings its members a round-up of what’s happening in education. From big, eye-catching headlines to the stories most papers overlook, we find the news our members really want to see. This week, we’re looking hard at Florida, guns, and violence in schools.



  • Even on the Most Hectic Days, My Job as a Teacher Is Truly Amazing

    By Lauren Danner


    It was a typical Thursday in the life of a high school teacher as the end of the marking period was quickly approaching. As soon as I finished teaching my classes, I began furiously correcting tests to make sure that my students would receive timely detailed feedback and the grades would be entered in time. In addition to the piles of uncorrected papers on my desk, my colleague and I were meeting to plan our next unit, a completely new series of lessons, and we needed to come up with something phenomenal. No pressure.



  • Modern Apprenticeships Offer Path to Career — and College

    February is Career and Technical Education Month. To highlight the accomplishments of career and technical education, we’re bringing you this article on apprenticeships originally published by The Hechinger Report.


    At least in word — if not always in deed — school districts across the United States have shifted from preparing students for college or careers, to preparing students for college and careers. District missions and visions have been re-written to reflect efforts to ready graduates for both paths, a signature goal of former President Barack Obama’s Race to the Top education program.



  • Weekly News Round-Up for February 9th

    Each week, AAE brings its members a round-up of what’s happening in education. From big, eye-catching headlines to the stories most papers overlook, we find the news our members really want to see. This week, a school district dumps classic literature, DeVos earns an ‘F’ from unions, and West Virginia and St. Louis prepare to strike!



  • Candy-less Activities for Valentine’s Day

    Valentine’s Day is right around the corner and with it comes the ubiquitous elementary classroom celebrations. In years past, these celebrations were sugar fests with students providing candy alongside their cards and parents and teachers working together to provide a party for students. However in recent years, the obesity epidemic has caused many teachers to rethink the ways of old.



  • Olympics in the Classroom

    This Friday, countries from all over the world are going to converge on Seoul, South Korea to begin the 2018 Winter Olympics. Students will doubtless be watching the coverage at home in the evenings, and incorporating the two-week celebration into lessons is a sure way to pique student interest and add relevance to the subject matter.



  • Weekly News Round-Up for February 2nd

    Each week, AAE brings its members a round-up of what’s happening in education. From big, eye-catching headlines to the stories most papers overlook, we find the news our members really want to see. This week, West Virginia teachers prepare to strike, a renewed emphasis on early childhood education, an accidental school shooting, and more.



  • AAE Celebrates World Read Aloud Day

    Today is World Read Aloud Day, a day set aside for schools and individuals to spend a few moments reading to each other. Reading aloud is a special and different activity than reading silently on a page.Readaloud.org reports that listening to a story read aloud is crucial for children to learn to love reading, and can promote literacy and language development in students. It also gives students access to stories that may be beyond their reach to read on their own.



  • The Life Skills Gap

    There’s been a lot of debate recently on what students need to know to be “college and career ready.” Typically, the debate centers on how high the standards for math and reading should be, how much social studies and science high school grads should participate in, and whether career and technical education should be given renewed emphasis. What seldom gets mentioned are the many small tasks that are essential to everyday life, but never make it into the curriculum.